In April of 1614, Captain John Smith of Virginia sailed near Ipswich, about which he recorded, “Here are many rising hills, and on their tops and descents are many corne fields and delightful groves… There is also Okes, Pines, Walnuts and other wood to make this place an excellent habitation, being a good and safe harbor.”

john_smith_description

News of the pleasantness of the Indian village, its good land and rich fisheries spread abroad. The Pilgrims, shivering in their rude huts at Plymouth, debated whether they should not migrate at once to this land of promise. Some of them “urged greatly the going to Agawam, which they heard to be an excellent harbor for ships, better ground and better fishing.” (Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.”)

topo_tilton_hill_view

The first settlers in Ipswich chose a spot with half-billion year old granite outcroppings as a worthy location for their meeting house. It is still known today as Meeting House Green or North Green. Yet most of the landforms in our town were formed less than 20,000 years ago. The book Roadside Geology of Massachusetts explains the unique geology of our area.

View animations of the supercontinents that created North America, and the ice ages that reshaped it.

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s