streetsofsalem

Over the years I have encountered people who were opposed to historic districts for a variety of reasons, prominently property rights and the sense that such building restrictions created homogeneous “museum neighborhoods”. I appreciate both arguments: I’m a bit of a libertarian myself and I have lived in historic districts since my 20s primarily because I like to look out the window when I get up every morning and look at historic buildings. But when I walk around Salem’s historic districts, I don’t see homogeneity, I see diversity: of building materials, of size, and even of style. Though Salem is renowned for its Federal architecture, there are many buildings in the downtown historic districts that pre-date and post-date this era, and I am always struck by how many houses were built in the later nineteenth century in styles that are far from “Victorian”: these are Colonial Revival structures melding into…

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3 thoughts on “Colonial and Colonial Revival houses

  1. Thank you for sharing, Gordon: I really enjoy your blog about Ipswich, my second favorite Essex County town! My husband and I have been relying on it quite a bit recently, as he is the architect for the restoration and redevelopment of your Old Town Hall.

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