The house at 33 East St. was built in approximately 1830 and is known as the “Old Store.” It was built at the corner of East and County Streets for use as a store by James Quimby. Quimby was a native of Sandwich, New Hampshire. Ipswich Vital Records show that in 1849 at the age of 29, he married Elizabeth Treadwell, daughter of William and Welcome Treadwell. Their home was on Summer St.  In 1850, Quimby’s store was moved to this location by Joseph Wait. James Quimby’s tombstone indicates that he died at the age of 38 in 1856.  Locations of their graves are from the book Memento Mori:

G — 151 — Elizabeth S. Quimby, wife of James Quimby, born March 14, 1822 ; Passed away Nov. 10, 1880. “She made all around her, happy.”
G — 152 — My Husband, James Quimby, died Dec. 9, 1856, aged 38 yrs. 7 mos.

33 East St. is known as the
33 East St. is known as the “Old Store.”

The land along the southwest side of East St. from  the intersection with County St. about halfway to Scottons Lane was granted in the settling of the town to John Baker. The land behind it and continuing to Scottons Lane was granted to John Kendrick. Thomas Franklin Waters fills in the details in his book, Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony:

A lot granted to John Baker in the area of 33 East St on the north and south sides was known as the “clay-pitts meadow.” John Baker sold this property to John Harris, and the meadow descended from John Harris to his sons. It was owned by John, then by John and William sons of John, and John sold his part of it to John Jr., Dec. 22, 1742. John Harris’ heirs owned the lot in 1832. His widow, Mary, sold the lot, or part of it, to Joseph Wait.

  • Joseph Wait sold a lot, measuring eight rods ten links, on East St., to Elizabeth Caldwell, widow of Thomas Caldwell, May 6, 1829. She removed a dwelling from another site, built in 1775,  to this spot. Her home, the “Elizabeth Caldwell house“, is at 27 East St
  • Mr. Wait moved a building used as a wash house, from the House of Correction grounds, and remodelled into the dwelling. The house still stands at 31 East St., and is known as the “Insane Asylum Wash House.”
  • Joseph Wait also bought a building, built for a grocery store by James Quimby on the corner of East and County Streets, and moved  it to a place on his lot in 1850. That is the building which is now at 33 East St, known as the “Old Store.” The 1856 and 1872 Ipswich Village maps both show that J. Wait owned 33 and 35 East St.
  • Joseph Wait’s home at 35 East Street continued in the family and is known as the Luther Wait house. Rebecca D. Wait, widow of Joseph, and others sold to Luther Wait and others, children of Wm.R. Wait, the house and land.
The Luther Wait house is on the left, the Insane Asylum wash house on the right, and the
The Luther Wait house is on the left, the Insane Asylum wash house on the right, and the “Old Store ” in in the center of this view of East St.

The 1832 “Philander” Ipswich map shows the window Elizabeth Caldwell at 27 East St. with B. Dawson next, and S. Spiller beyond, on the same side. The Spiller remained for years, but the “B. Dawson” house disappeared. From Memento Mori:

G— 26 —FATHER MOTHER.

  • Benjamin Dawson died May 15, 1861, aged 78 yrs.
  • Martha, His wife, died Sept 16, 1871, Ahr. 84 yrs. 6 mos.

The 1856 Ipswich Village Map shows Elizabeth Caldwell at 27 East, followed by two houses owned by Wait, then J. Wells, and Hovey at the corner of Scottons Lane.

In 1872, S. Hunt now lives at the Widow Caldwell’s house, G.W. Falls is at 31 East St., the J. Wait estate at 33, and Mrs. Hovey still near the corner  of Scottons Lane.

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