Maple Street

A white arrow in the photo below points to the house at 6 Maple Street, with a horse in front. The photo was taken from Town Hill by Edward Darling, around 1890. In the foreground are houses still standing on High Street. On the far left of the photo is the old Lord Square fire station and … Continue reading Maple Street

Turner Hill

Brief excerpts from "A Short History of the Rice Estate, 1890-1945" by Rev. Robert F. Ippolito, M.S., published in 1976, with pictures from the October 1903 issue of "Architectural Review." Additional photos from the Turner Hill Residential Community site. Anne Proctor was born on September 18, 1869 in Peabody Massachusetts, and married Charles G. Rice … Continue reading Turner Hill

Patronage and Scandal at the Ipswich Customs House

The Ipswich Custom House The exact location of the Ipswich Custom House has never been verified. Shown above is a photograph of the Town Wharf area taken by Arthur Wesley Dow, sometime between 1905 and 1910. Alice Keenan wrote that the small building on the right had been the customs house. Later photos show a sign … Continue reading Patronage and Scandal at the Ipswich Customs House

Holyoke-French house, Boxford Ma

Colonial houses of Boxford

Houses built during the Colonial era in Boxford, Massachusetts. Listings and images provided by the MACRIS site of the Massachusetts Historical Commission, and by Vision Properties for the Town of Boxford, with additional historical information from The Dwellings of Boxford, by Sidney Perley BOX.48, Dr. William Hale, Rev. William P. Alcott House, 2 Elm St, 1770: This house … Continue reading Colonial houses of Boxford

Is Purity Possible?

streetsofsalem

Architectural purity, I mean: there’s no philosophical, spiritual or political rumination going on here. My house is such an assemblage of Federal, Greek Revival and eclectic Victorian styles that I often find myself craving architectural purity: it was “transitional” when it was built in 1827 and it became even more so over the next century as it was expanded and remodeled over the next century. A whole rear elbow ell of outbuildings was attached and then shorn off. Inside straightforward Federal mouldings were replaced with rounded Italianate ones; a simple staircase was replaced with one much more detailed and made of mahogany, and 1920s etched glass was inserted into the original doors. Even its “classic” exterior with flushboard facade was altered: with the customary bay window that pops out nearly everywhere in the later nineteenth century and an elaborate doorway below, and some curvy trim attached to the first-floor windows…

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Sketches of Cape Ann

From Gloucester and Cape Ann by S. G. W. Benjamin, Harper's New Monthly Magazine, September 1875