In the spring of 1639 Rowley was settled as a plantation by twenty familes who accompanied the Reverend Ezekiel Rogers from England on the ship John of London. The town was incorporated on September 4, 1639, and originally included portions of Byfield, Groveland, Georgetown, and Haverhill. Rogers had served as pastor in Rowley, East Riding of Yorkshirefor twenty years before his suspension due to non-conformist Puritan beliefs. In 1642, the first keystone arch bridge and a dam in the colony were built on the Mill River.

Pearson-Dummer house, Rowley - A lot of history and even more character are everywhere in  1714 Pearson-Dummer home in Rowley. Continue reading: Gov. Dummer lived here in Rowley, by Barbara Forster for the Ipswich Chronicle MACRIS Pearson, Capt. John House, Glen St, Rowley Year Constructed: 1714 Architectural Style(s): Colonial; Federal The Capt. John Pearson House was built in 1714 … Continue reading Pearson-Dummer house, Rowley
The ancient houses of Rowley, Massachusetts - This page displays the First Period, Georgian, and early Federal houses of Rowley, MA, settled in 1639 as a plantation by Reverend Ezekiel Rogers, who had arrived from England on the ship John of London with approximately twenty families.The town was named after Rowley, East Riding of Yorkshire, where Rogers had served as pastor. At the time it … Continue reading The ancient houses of Rowley, Massachusetts
Roads to Paradise - Paradise Road Thomas Franklin Waters wrote: “The early farm of Mr. Charles Day was on the ancient way, now called not inaptly Paradise Road, for it is a very beautiful road, winding through long stretches of woodland, where ferns and brakes grow luxuriantly, and every kind of wild flower finds congenial haunt in open glades or shaded nooks.” 
Ipswich Village Philander map 1832 Ipswich Village on the Old Rowley Road - The following narrative includes excerpts from Ipswich Village and the Old Rowley Road. by Thomas Franklin Waters in 1915. “At the very beginning of the Town, High Street was the road to Newbury or ‘the pathway leading toward the River of Merrimac.’ No section of our Town has more substantial and picturesque interest than this quiet … Continue reading Ipswich Village on the Old Rowley Road
A ramble in Ipswich, 1686 - Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that in 1686, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart who lived in the ancient Caleb Lord house on High Street (no longer standing), “were favored with a visit from  the book-seller John Dunton, who came to Ipswich in the course of his saddle-bag peregrinations.” 
Clam Battle! (Life Magazine, July 16, 1945) - An article from the July 16, 1945 Life magazine: Last Summer, as their forefathers had for 300 years before them, the people of Ipswich and Rowley were making a comfortable living out of the rich juicy clams from the briny marsh along the Parker River. Last winter they suddenly discovered a proclamation posted on their land. … Continue reading Clam Battle! (Life Magazine, July 16, 1945)
The Agawam Diner - The Agawam Diner on Rt. 1 in Rowley was built by the Fodero Dining Car Company in 1954. An earlier Agawam Diner was opened by the Galanis Family at Depot Square in Ipswich in 1940, and was replaced by a larger diner, and then by the current one in 1954. The diner was moved from … Continue reading The Agawam Diner
Grave Discoveries - Today I was asked for help finding the original location of two old tombstones which were found at Barton Stone in Ipswich. An earlier operator of the business thought these were worth keeping and put them away. Bill Boyington created the wonderful site FindaGrave with photos and inscriptions from tombstones, many of which are in Essex County. Using his site, it didn’t … Continue reading Grave Discoveries
Adrift on a Haystack legend Rowley Adrift on a Haystack, 1876 - A remarkable northeasterly storm on the 4th of December, 1786 caused most of the salt hay along the North Shore to be set afloat and lost in the tide. Samuel Pulsifer and Samuel Elwell, both of Rowley were digging clams on the flats in Plum Island Sound and got caught in the storm. The Rev. Ebenezer Bradford … Continue reading Adrift on a Haystack, 1876
The Glen Mill Stone Arch Bridge - The town of Rowley was “set off” from Ipswich in 1639, just 5 years after the founding of Ipswich. In 1642, a bridge and a dam were built on the Mill River in Rowley. A fulling mill was built the following year by Thomas Nelson, who had been granted ten acres of land “for encouragement … Continue reading The Glen Mill Stone Arch Bridge