Ipswich woodcut,1838 attributed to S. E. Brown.

Market Square and the lower North Green, a photographic history

Featured image: Ipswich woodcut attributed to S. E. Brown, 1838, or John Warner Barber, 1839

Market Street, a photographic retrospective

Photos of Market St. from the present day back to the early days of photography.

Summer Street

Summer Street may be the oldest public way in Ipswich, and in the earliest days of the settlement was called Stony Street, or simply "The Way to the River. " Thomas Franklin Waters wrote that for two centuries it was Annable's Lane, named after settler John Annable. In the Colonial years, streets tended to be named for topographical … Continue reading Summer Street

Old North Burying Ground

The Old North Burying Ground in Ipswich, Massachusetts was established in 1634 upon the founding of the town of the town, and is one of the oldest cemeteries in North America. The Old North Burying Ground is located at the intersection of High Street and Rt 133/1A. View at Google maps. Index by map location Alphabetical index of graves … Continue reading Old North Burying Ground

Thomas Dennis, legendary Ipswich joiner

In 1937, Irving P. Lyon published a series of six articles about Thomas Dennis, joiner of Ipswich, analyzing numerous articles of furniture and family documents. The furniture of Thomas Dennis took on the status of historic treasure, and over time more pieces were attributed to him than he could have produced in his lifetime. In 1960, … Continue reading Thomas Dennis, legendary Ipswich joiner

Jewett Hill, Ipswich Village map

Ipswich Village on the Old Rowley Road

Featured image: "Ipswich Village" in the 1832 Philander map of the town of Ipswich. The following narrative includes excerpts from Ipswich Village and the Old Rowley Road. by Thomas Franklin Waters in 1915. "At the very beginning of the Town, High Street was the road to Newbury or 'the pathway leading toward the River of Merrimac.' No … Continue reading Ipswich Village on the Old Rowley Road

Photos from Ipswich

Many of these photos were digitally developed from original glass negatives taken by three early Ipswich photographers, Arthur Wesley Dow, George Dexter, and Edward L. Darling.