William Pulcifer was a dry goods storekeeper who built the combination storefront, office and residence building at 34 North Main Street in 1836. This gable-roof Federal style building is the only brick residence in the Meetinghouse Green historic District, and one of few pre-Civil war brick buildings remaining in Ipswich.

From MACRIS, the Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System:

William Pulcifer bought this lot in 1836 (293:140) and erected the brick building soon thereafter. The building was called the “new brick block” in the 1830’s and it was a bee-hive of activity. As waters described the scene (p. 579, vol. II) In the upper floor the Ipswich Register was printed, and Mr. L.E. Cole, a portrait painter, had rooms. On the street floor were several stores. Samuel Hale, under the startling caption, “Not Dead Yet”, announced that he would make a permanent business in Ipswich , and continued to manufacture boots and shoes “at the sign of the Golden Boot in the New Brick.”

William Pulcifer had a store here and sold broad-cloths and satinettes, boots and shoes, and had on hand 5,000 Cape Good Hope sheepskins, “sumac tanned, and a lot of wool suitable for saddlers and upholsterers.”

Sources:

  • Philander Anderson, Map of Ipswich, 1832.
  • T.F. Waters, Ipswich in the Mass. Bay Colony, vol. I, p. 349, vol. II, p. 579
  • MACRIS, the Massachusetts Cultural Resource Information System
Photo of the William Pulcifer house by the Ipswich Historical Commission, on the MACRIS site.
Photo of the William Pulcifer house by the Ipswich Historical Commission, on the MACRIS site.